Jan
14
  • Footage shows moment NSW mother drives into oncoming freight train near Taree

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    Mother drives into Taree freight train Footage played in the Newcastle District Court showed the car trying to brake before it was hit by the train. Photo: Channel Seven
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    The scene of the accident near Taree in April 2016. Photo: Scott Calvin

    TweetFacebookA mother has sobbed in court as footage was played showing the terrifying moment she drove into the path of an oncoming freight train with her three children in the car.

    The woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, failed to stop as the train passed over a small country road at Moorland, near Taree,in April 2016.

    Footage taken from the train showed the woman’s car slamming on the brakes and skidding onto the tracks.

    The train driver blows a horn shortly before impact, and debris can be seen flying into the air as the train’s brakes screech.

    It took 50 seconds for the train, loaded with thousands of tonnes of steel, to stop and its driver feared the people he hit were dead.

    On Friday, a judge in the Newcastle District Court showed the mother mercy by sparing her from a jail term so she can continue to care for her children, one of whom was left brain damaged by the crash.

    “[The children are]victims of this offence, to send their mother into jail at this moment will make them victims of this sentence,” Judge Roy Ellis said.

    Two of the three girls- who were aged two, five and seven at the time – suffered critical injuries, with one needing CPR to be revived at the scene by a passing police officer.

    One daughter still requires 24-hour care due to a brain injury suffered in the accident and her motherbarely manages to communicate with her through a series of hand squeezes.

    The mother had pleaded guilty to two counts of dangerous driving causing grievous bodily harm.

    On Friday, shereceived15 months and 18 months in jail for each child that was critically injured, but the sentence was suspended given her need to care for them.

    The scene of the accident near Taree in April 2016. Photo: Scott Calvin

    “There are some cases that call for mercy,”Judge Ellis said.

    “This offender has punished herself immensely every day since the accident.”

    Outside court, the mother said: “A split second can just change your life.”

    As video of the incident was played in court, she covered her eyes and ears,sobbing through the ordeal.

    The impact sent the car rolling down an embankment, the court heard.

    Judge Ellis described the crossing where the accident occurred as “rather dangerous”.

    He said there were no boom gates, no lights and grass two to three metres in height along the side of the road.

    “It is a tragic situation without a shadow of a doubt,” he said.

    Footage played in the Newcastle District Court showed the car trying to brake before it was hit by the train. Photo: Channel Seven

    The woman, who was 30 at the time of the accident, was also suspended from driving for five years.

    AAP

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Jan
14
  • North Korea test-fires ballistic missile, news agency reports

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    North Korean tanks took part in a live-fire drill on Wednesday. Photo: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via APNorth Korea unsuccessfully test-fired a ballistic missile on Saturday from a region north of its capital, Pyongyang, South Korea’s military said, defying intense pressure from the United States and the reclusive state’s main ally, China.
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    The test came as U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned the United Nations Security Council that failure to curb North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs could lead to ‘catastrophic consequences’.

    USand South Korean officials said the test appeared to have failed, in what would be a fourth successive unsuccessful missile test since March.

    USofficials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the missile was probably a medium-range missile known as a KN-17 and appears to have broken up within minutes of taking off.

    Tension had spiked on the Korean peninsula over concerns the North may conduct the test-launch of a long-range missile or its sixth nuclear test around the time of the April 15 anniversary of its state founder’s birth or the day marking the founding of its military earlier this week.

    The timing of the latest launch suggests it was calculated to send a certain message as Pyongyang remains under intense attention of world powers, said Kim Dong-yub, an expert at Kyungnam University’s Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul.

    “It was planned at a complicated timing around the end of the South Korea-U.S. joint military drills, the United States talking about military options and the announcement of North Korea policies and the Security Council meeting,” Kim said.

    South Korean and USforces have been conducting annual military drills since the start of March that conclude at the end of April.

    In a show of force, the United States is sending the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier group to waters off the Korean peninsula, where it will join the USS Michigan, a nuclear submarine that docked in South Korea on Tuesday.

    USPresident Donald Trump told Reuters in an interview on Thursday a “major, major conflict” with North Korea was possible over its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

    Trump praised Chinese leader Xi Jinping for “trying very hard” to rein in Pyongyang.

    But both China and Russia rebuked Washington’s threat of military force at a meeting of the UNSecurity Council on the matter on Friday.

    Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the 15-member council it was not only up to China to solve the North Korean problem.

    “The key to solving the nuclear issue on the peninsula does not lie in the hands of the Chinese side,” Wang told the council in blunt remarks that Tillerson later rebuffed.

    The UN Security Council is likely to start discussing a statement to condemn the missile launch, said diplomats, adding that it was unlikely to be issued on Friday.

    The Security Council traditionally condemns all missile launches by Pyongyang.

    “It could have happened today exactly because we had the meeting,” Italian UN Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi, chair of the Security Council’s North Korean sanctions committee, told reporters when hearing of the test.

    “It’s illegal, it should not be done, it’s another provocative action by North Korea.”

    Neighbouring Japan said the “unacceptable” launch clearly violated UNresolutions and said it had lodged a strong protest with North Korea.

    Reuters

    The story, North Korea test-fires ballistic missile, news agency reports, first appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald.

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Jan
14
  • Photos from AFL round 6 match between Giants and Bulldogs

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    AFL round 6: Giants v Bulldogs Heath Shaw and Dylan Shiel of the Giants lead their team from the ground after the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images
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    Shane Mumford and Devon Smith of the Giants celebrate winning the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval on April 28, 2017. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    The Giants celebrates victory after the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    Toby Greene of the Giants celebrates a goal during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval on Friday night. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Toby Greene of the Giants makes a late hit on Caleb Daniel of the Bulldogs during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Giants players celebrate winning the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Fletcher Roberts of the Bulldogs tackles Steve Johnson of the Giants during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Jeremy Cameron of the Giants is congratulated by team mates after kicking a goal during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Rory Lobb of the Giants and Marcus Adams and Fletcher Roberts of the Bulldogs contest a mark during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Toby Greene of the Giants celebrates a goal during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs. Photo by Mark Nolan/AFL Media/Getty Images

    Heath Shaw, Shane Mumford and Dylan Shiel of the Giants lead their team from the ground after the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    Nathan Wilson of the Giants celebrates victory during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    Bailey Williams of the Bulldogs flies over Toby Greene of the Giants during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    Toby Greene of the Giants is tackled high by Jack Macrae of the Bulldogs during the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    The Bulldogs look dejected after the round six AFL match between the Greater Western Sydney Giants and the Western Bulldogs at UNSW Canberra Oval. Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

    TweetFacebook💪💪💪 #AFLGiantsDogs Photo: Ryan Pierse/Getty Images pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/ZJUiIXrrOf

    — AFL Photos (@AFLphotos) April 28, 2017The Giants stood up when they needed to, as the stars for both sides came out to play. Match report: https://t苏州夜场招聘/PikY6XtZ8Kpic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/n7zAk156KT

    — AFL (@AFL) April 28, 2017

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Jan
14
  • Amazing machine makes new coal in hours

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    I have just spent a pleasant weekend of driving to Braidwood, speaking at a biochar workshop and learning a great deal about the importance of fungi and biochar for tree growth.
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    Not to mention all those extra kilometres for not paying attention to the idiocy of my electronic navigator.

    The attraction in this beautiful part of the state near Canberra was to see the launch of an n-made mobile charcoal maker, the Crossfire Retort, a pyrolysis machine that converts wood and bones into biochar and bonechar for use in agriculture.

    This technology runs the greenhouse system backwards by mining carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to remake (char) coal and put it in the soil. Instead of millennia, new coal can be made in hours.

    The biochar is very good for the soil in two ways.

    Its inert porous structure forms a great home for the bacteria and fungi necessary for plant growth.It also contains the minerals and salts that were present in the original plant material and returns these to the soil.

    Use of charcoal in agriculture is not new technology, evidence is available around the world including the Inca of the Amazon and the Maori of New Zealand.

    At the conference I learnt that a pinch of biochar in the potting mix along with mycorrhizal fungi stimulates markedly the growth of pine seedlings when compared to fungi alone.

    Recent research is confirming that biochar can double the water holding capacity of sandy soils and also accelerate the accumulation of Soil Organic Carbon in soil.

    I am looking forward to my next trip in late July to attend the Braidwood Truffle Festival. It will offer a double delightof truffle food aplenty and lectures by some of the world’s best truffle scientists.

    Professor Tim Roberts is the director of the Tom Farrell Institute for the Environment at theUniversity of Newcastle

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Jan
14
  • The week that was:April 21 – 28PHOTOS

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    The week that was | PHOTOS SPARKLING: Merle Phillipps, centre, celebrates her 100th birthday with daughter Jenny Wilkinson and son Tony Phillipps. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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    HUNTER: Jeff Wall from Multiplex and Tim Beattie from Stockland at the construction zone for the next stage of work. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

    ANZAC DAY: Two-up at The Family Hotel in Maitland. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

    HUNTER: Trevor Dickinson’s mural is back on the bricks near Maitland train station. This time permanently. Picture: Perry Duffin

    Dawn service in Maitland

    Anzac Day 2017 service at East Maitland

    HUNTER: Chelsea Mordue, with mum Krystle. An image of Chelsea being saved was one of the most memorabe from the 2015 superstorm. Picture: Perry Duffin

    Nine Mile Ocean Classic at Blacksmiths postponed following shark activity in Swansea Channel

    Newcastle parking: city council’s proposed new parking fee structure criticised as a cash grab

    Ocean Street, Dudley’s road to ruin

    Peabody Energy lost a battle against a Bulga farmer, and the skirmishes continue

    ‘Pie in the sky’: Labor councillors question state government’s affordable housing plan for former Newcastle rail corridor

    NHRU: Adrian Delore to represent family after brother Michael succumbs to head knock

    TEST HOPEFULS: Bec Young, Caitlin Morgan, and Simone Smith are all in the preliminary Jillaroos squad.

    Masked thieves targeted Melville Jewellers and Wallace Bishop Jewellers in Westfield Kotara heist

    RSPCA appeal over Hugo dumped at Muswellbrook

    Bite into the Donald Trump burger at Burger Urge in Glendale

    Relay for Life: Brett Kimmorley and daughters to walk in honour of late mum Sharnie

    Honoured: Camberwell’s Wendy Bowman holds her Goldman Environmental Prize high at a ceremony in San Francisco on Tuesday.

    Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service

    Sue Gilbert prepares for her 15th Dobell Festival of Arts and Crafts at Wangi District Workers Club

    A young woman is in a critical condition after a crash that trapped her inside the wreckage of her car for more than an hour.

    Singleton Co-Op reunion to be held this October

    Sandy Hollow Charity Horse Ride raises funds for Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service

    Scone High School student David Kalev-Roy a finalist at JMC Academy Martini Film Awards Sydney

    Hydro appoints CMA Contracting to demolish Kurri Kurri aluminium smelter

    Power Choices event in Dungog to help families

    Hundreds of people attended the Clarence Town Anzac Dawn service this year to pay their respects.

    National Parks Association Bushwalking in the Upper Hunter

    Upper Hunter Community Services offers children a Licence to Ride

    TweetFacebookThe week in news across the Hunter.

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Dec
12
  • Jeff McCloy says he still has ‘unfinished business’ on Newcastle City Council

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    WOULD HE RUN AGAIN: Former lord mayor Jeff McCloy says that he’s asked if he’d run for mayor ‘almost every day’, and while it might be unlikely, he hasn’t ruled out a return. Picture: Cole BennettsWOULD Jeff McCloy ever return to local politics?
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    Well, the answer’s complicated.

    Mr McCloy, the larger-than-life personality who dramatically won, and then lost, the city’s lord mayoralty between 2012 and 2014, has remained a highly visible figure in Newcastle’s political scene since he resigned in the heat ofthe Independent Commission Against Corruption’s inquiry into political donations made before the 2011 state election.

    From interventions about the controversial light rail route, to challenging the ICAC in the High Court of , Mr McCloy has lost none of his famously forthright nature.

    But since the conclusion of ICAC’sOperation Spicer investigation, which found Mr McCloy“acted with the intention”of evading laws about thedisclosure of political donations and the ban on donations from property developers, the question being asked in some circles is:would he ever run again?

    The man himselfsays that he’s onlyan outside chance of putting his hand up in September,but don’t rule him outcompletely.

    “Look when I walk down the street in Newcastle or I’m in the company of certain people, or really just anywhere in the community I almost get asked every day,” Mr McCloy told theNewcastle Herald.

    “It’s difficult. I don’t think so, but it’s still this thought that crosses my mind every now and again because there is just so much unfinished business.

    “I’ll leave it there, for now, I think.”

    Watch this space, then.

    If he was ever tempted back onto the public stage though, the well-resourced independent who managed to match the Labor machine at the 2012 electionwould pose a formidable challenge to the established parties.

    The Liberal Party is still undecided about who their candidate might be, and the city’s current Lord Mayor, Nuatali Nelmes, has weathered a tough few months of negative publicity over her council expenses.

    Mr McCloy declined to offer a commentary on the council’s direction since his resignation –saying he would “keep those thoughts private” –but did offer what appeared to be aveiled swipe at Cr Nelmes, saying that he “ran into staff from time to time” but that it was “best not to repeat things”.

    Mr McCloy resigned in 2014 after he admitted to giving donations to three Liberal Party candidates who became MPs in the lead up to the 2012 election, famously telling the inquiry that at times he felt “like a walking ATM”.

    Mr McCloy has previouslytried to overturn the ban on developers donating to politicians in the High Court, and unsuccessfully challenged the ICAC’s conduct in the Supreme Court.

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Dec
12
  • OpinionThe Post Office: our crumbling monument to inertia

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    OUTDOOR PERCH: Even the pigeons are fed up with the city’s ‘imploding urinal’.G’DAY whingers.
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    It’s early May and the cold winds of change are blowing through the future jewel-in-the-Asia-Pacific. Gav the NBN weatherman said last Wednesday that it is time to pull out the door sausage and cover up the cracks. I typed “door sausage” straight into the Google machine. I now await the imminent arrival ofA Current Affair and the NSW police.

    I wish the cold winds of change would blow on the Newcastle Post Office. The government’s parliamentary secretary for the Hunter Scot MacDonald has provided a $150 000 heritage grant that will go towards “stabilising” the building. Will the gift from NSW taxpayers be repaid if and when its owners – the Awabakal Land Council – manage to flog it off? This whole caper looks more and more like torturous demolition by neglect. A landmark building is now little more than a gaping sore – an imploding urinal that stands as a crumbling monument to inertia, very bad decisions and ongoing buck passing.

    The ALC was put into administration last October after investigations into its governance and financial administration revealed significant problems. ALC boss at the time Richard Green was talking up big overseas investors backing post office redevelopment. Sounded promising. Nothing eventuated.

    Information about the type and scope of allegations against anyone in the ALC have not been revealed nor discussed openly by the government, the opposition or the ALC. It’s certain there was plenty of internal bickering – but that’s par for the course for many organisations – from footy clubs to the UN.Attempts to get a copy of the investigator’s report – under NSW Freedom of Information laws – to then Minister Leslie Williams that resulted in the appointment of an administrator to run the ALC have been refused. Attempts to get a copy of the ALC’s response to the allegations were also refused. The NSW agency responsible, the Department of Education, argued that it is not in the public interest for either report to be made public. An appeal to the Information Commissioner against the agency’s decision to not release the documents resulted in the Commissioner making “no recommendation”.

    One of the reasons given for the refusal to release the reports is that matters relating to alleged fraud, corruption, mismanagement or misappropriation at the ALC may be potentially investigated by the NSW police, ICAC and/or the NSW Ombudsman. Release of the documents could have a prejudicial effect on investigation. Fair enough, but once a decision is made to either charge or not charge persons, that reason for not releasing the documents will dissipate. Prudent document redaction can sort out defamation potentialities if no charges are laid. Remove the door sausage.

    There is no obligation for the ALC to answer inquiries from the media and they have long chosen to engage with the media on their own terms. Media calls and inquiries go unanswered and unreturned. That is their right. Equally, there is no obligation for the media to act as an ALC cheer squad and cover their “announcements” that are self-congratulatory or promise pie-in-the-sky schemes.But given the future of the city’s most iconic building lies chiefly with the ALC, surely the people of Newcastle have some right to know if, when and what sort of shenanigans may have been going on in that organisation.

    Should we hold our collective breath or back the post office’s bulldozing? It’s been 15 bloody years and there’s no end in sight.

    Cold winds indeed.

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Dec
12
  • Robert Dillon: Sporting Declaration

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    UNCERTAINTY: Newcastle Knights skipper Trent Hodkinson is set to play in reserve grade this weekend after being dropped by coach Nathan Brown. Picture: Getty Images AFTER Newcastle’s round-one loss to the Titans on the Gold Coast last season, Sporting Declaration stopped at Jupiters Casino for a beer and a bite to eat.
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    Pretty much the first person I bumped into was Tyrone Roberts, who was out with his new scrumbase partner, Ashley Taylor.

    I’m not sure if they were having a gamblebut what can be said without doubt, with the benefit of hindsight, is the Titans have backed a winner, albeit by default.

    Roberts and Taylor might never have paired up at the Gold Coast, other than for exceptional circumstances.

    In 2015, Gold Coast thought they had signed Daly Cherry-Evans, only for the former Test half to renege on the deal at the 11thhour to re-sign with Manly.

    In the meantime, the Titans lost five-eighth Aidan Sezer, who agreed to join Canberra.

    That left Gold Coast with one half for 2016, rookie Kane Elgey, and as the season progressed, alternative options were few and far between.

    In August they took a punt on 20-year-old Taylor, who was yet to play an NRL game for Brisbane. A week or so later they signed Roberts, whose two-year-deal was partially subsidised by a $200,000 payout from Newcastle.

    The reason Roberts was available was because, even though he had a year to run on his contract, the Knights had recruited Canterbury and NSW Origin halfback Trent Hodkinson to replace him.

    At the time, signing Hodkinson appeared a wise strategic move. But less than halfway into his three-season deal, the club captain is facing an uncertain future after being dumped to reserve grade by coach Nathan Brown.

    Rewind two years and the Knights could surely never have imagined such a scenario unfolding.

    Hodkinson was considered the best halfback in the state and a player capable of alleviating the pressure building onKnights coach Rick Stone.

    Stone’s halves that season were to be Roberts and Jarrod Mullen, but the latter broke a bone in his foot in round 10 and did not play again that season.

    In his absence, Roberts struggled with the responsibility of taking over as primary playmaker. As the losses mounted, Newcastle reached the conclusion that they needed a more consistent andreliable No.7.

    The two on the market were James Maloney and Hodkinson. Maloney eventually switched from the Roosters to Cronulla, helping them win a premiership in his first season.

    Hodkinson joined the Knights, collecting a wooden spoon straight up.

    The planthat he would form a complementary partnership with Mullen remains sadly unfulfilled.

    In theory theyappeared ideally matched.

    Hodkinson is a right-foot kicker, Mullen left-footed. Hodkinson is an organiser, Mullen’s strength was his running game.

    The Knights were happy to invest more than $3 million in the pair over three years, believing they would provide the stability and organisation around which they could build a successful team.

    If only.

    As it panned out, Hodkinson and Mullenplayed only 14 games together, for one win.

    Stone did not even get to coach his star recruit. He was sacked before Hodkinson hadarrived.

    After an injury-plagued 2016, Mullen tested positive to a banned steroid and is now awaiting a suspension that is expected to end his career.

    And whether Hodkinson appears again in Newcastle’s top team is a matter of conjecture.

    The master plan Newcastle officials hatched two years ago has unravalled spectacularly. Yet to suggest that they should have shown more foresight seems, to me, a tad harsh.

    On reflection, it always seemed strange that Canterbury –a club famed for its solidarity –had not foughtharder to retain their NSW Origin halfback.

    Yet the notion that he arrived in Newcastle with a bung knee, which has since worsened, is not evidenced by his career record.

    In the three seasons before he joined the Knights, Hodkinson played in 20, 25 and 19 games for the Bulldogs –the latter cut short by a dislocated wrist –and six Origins.

    Before he was dropped last week, he had played in 30 of a possible 31 games for Newcastle –more than any of his teammates.

    That does not suggest a player who is a lame duck.

    Moreover, if his on-field performances have come under scrutiny, perhaps it could be noted that in the six seasons before he joined Newcastle, only once did Hodkinson’s teams not make the finals.

    It’s a far tougher proposition playing for –statistically at least –the worst team ofthe NRL era.

    All of which must remind Roberts that being off-loaded by Newcastle was the luckiest break of his career.

    He hasplayed in 29 of the Titans’33games since the start of last season, including the qualifying-final loss to Brisbane.

    This season he’s shown his versatility by playing in the halves, off the bench, hooker and fullback.

    The 25-year-old is heading into the best years of his career, and the Titans are reportedly keen to re-sign him.

    If he had his time over, I doubt he would change a thing. Somehow it’s hard to imagine the Knights expressing similar sentiments.

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Dec
12
  • Civic Green officially opened at Old Strokers Pool Hall site on King Street

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    From bikie clubhouse to boutique apartments Life Property Group managing director Bill Ryder, Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes and managing director of PRDnationwide Newcastle Mark Kentwell at the official opening on Friday. Picture: Marina Neil
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    The building when it was used as the Strokers Pool Hall.

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The Rebels bikie clubhouse is dismantled by police in February 2014. Picture: Darren Pateman

    The new Civic Green apartments. Picture: Marina Neil

    The official opening of the Civic Green apartments on King Street. Claudio Minns and Bill Ryder from Life Property Group are pictured with Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes. Picture: Marina Neil

    Bill Ryder from Life Property Group at the official opening of the Civic Green apartments on Friday. Picture: Marina Neil

    Inside the Civic Green apartments.

    Inside the new ‘Civic Green’ apartments.

    Inside the new ‘Civic Green’ apartments.

    Inside the new ‘Civic Green’ apartments.

    Inside the new ‘Civic Green’ apartments.

    TweetFacebookOfficial opening of Civic Green apartments at old Strokers Pool Hall and bikie clubhouse. pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/ST42MFg8dy

    — Carrie Fellner (@carriefellner) April 28, 2017

    A large number of parking spaces for bicycles and scooters have been provided, but only six car parking spaces.

    That appeared to be no obstacle tobuyers, who quickly snapped up all 32 apartments off the plan.

    “So we wereexpecting there to be a strong tilt of investors but there’sactually ended up being more owner-occupiers,” Mr Kentwell said.

    Most were embracing bicycles, public transport and walking as an alternative to commutingby car, he said.

    “Not every building is going to be able to offer car parking…[but] all aroundthe world the dense cities that people love to visit are constrained withparking,” he said.

    Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes said the council was pleased that the private sector appeared to be behind thepush fora liveable and walkable city with cycleways and active transport links.

    “They’ve already made that investment and that investment is being opened today. I think that’s a really good sign,” she said.

    “It’s great the developers have acknowledged how good Newcastle City Council hasbeen to work with. I have to pay tribute to our building and development staff…we’ve kept the numbers thesame and we’ve seen a huge influx of DAs.”

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Dec
12
  • WPL: South Wallsend out for redemption in rematch against Merewether

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    South Wallsend captain Laura Byrnes described the Wolves’ opening round performance in the Herald Women’s Premier League as “a shaky start” and was looking forward to showing how far they had come since the 6-0 loss to Merewether when they host the unbeaten leaders on Sunday.
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    South Wallsend skipper Laura Byrnes.

    “We had a lot of new players and we were a little bit overwhelmed,” Byrnes said.

    But the former n schoolgirl, who is a Merewether junior,believes it will be a much tighter contest this weekend.

    South Wallsend have shown improvement in every outing since and produced their best performance of the season in their last hit-out. They went down1-0 to defending champions Warners Bay but Byrnes said “we showed a lot of character”.

    Their biggest enemy so far this season has been the weather. The Wolves have played just four of their matches as the competition heads into round eight.

    “It’s been disappointing that we haven’t been able to get any momentum,” Byrnes said.

    “I feel like that first game was a bit of a write-off. We’ll still be aware of it and will definitely respect Merewether but we are looking forward to it.

    “It will be a good indication of how far we have come since that first round.”

    South Wallsend will be without midfielder Erin Wilson, who is sidelined with an ankle injury, but coach Gary Wilson said former W-League player Stacey Day “is getting closer to a starting spot”.

    Merewether travel to Walker Fields after disposing of Adamstown 6-0 in a rescheduled match on Wednesday night in a performancecoach Cassie Koppen described as “probably the best I have seen us play since I have been coaching at Merewether”.

    Unitedwill be missinggoalkeeper Alison Logue, Grace Macintyre, Rebekah Stuart and Sarah Halvorsen through unavailability.

    Warners Bay player-coach Cassidy Davis wants to see tighter defence when they play Rosebud at Adamstown Oval on Saturday.

    Adamstown coach Ben Herron is calling for “consistency”, describing his side’s performances so far as “Jeckyll and Hyde”.

    Mid North Coast and Thornton will both be desperate for points when they meet at Thornton Park in the other match on Sunday.

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